Blog 145. The Backyard Fence

In those neighborhoods where single-family houses still exist, back yards are usually fenced. So are some front yards. Why is this? What motivates us to put up fences when a once-popular western song was Don’t Fence Me In? Continue reading

Blog 143. Blaming the consequences of climate

We experience events, not the global situation, but the world seems simpler if we can trace each event to a cause. However, within a complex system, an event cannot be ascribed to a unique “cause.” Birds flock and fish school and the stock market tumbles due to the many interactions among the participating individuals. Continue reading

Blog 140. Liberal ideology versus political reality

Today, the adjectives “conservative” and “liberal” imply an identity group.  However, at one time, the term “conservative” implied following authority, applying principles presumed to be tried-and-true. The term “liberal” implied questioning and testing.  Continue reading

Blog 139. American Angst Part 7 of 7: Synopsis

The main function of government is to protect the commons—those things that maintain and benefit society as a whole. That’s law and order. Continue reading

Blog 138. American Angst Part 6 of 7: Relieving angst in a complex system

The daily TV news sustains the angst in America,* but unlike the repetitive TV news, the situation isn’t hopeless.

The known science of complex systems indicates the route to remedy: alter the rules of interaction among the players. Continue reading

Blog 135. American Angst Part 3 of 7: Engineered Inequality

America has greater inequality than any other advanced country.[1]

Among the advanced countries of the world, America has the greatest wealth, but also the greatest inequality in wealth.  The U.S. ranks 27th out of 27 high-income countries in median wealth per adult.  The top 1% took home 22% of all income in 2015. Continue reading